Category Archives: Mardi Gras

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List of Parades for 2014 Mardi Gras: February 26 – March 3

The parades are growing more numerous the closer we get to the real Fat Tuesday! New Orleans and the surrounding cities are proud to be the real McCoy when it comes to Mardi Gras. Other places do it, but we are the original and most well-known, and we revel in that fact!

Krewe of Druis parade, lady dressed in red fur, man in medieval dressFebruary 26
Starting off Uptown, the Krewe of Druids and their mysterious leader, the Archdruid, begin at 6:30, followed immediately by the all-female Mystic Krewe of Nyx, one of the newer krewes, formed in 2012.

February 27
We stay uptown for the Knights of Babylon parade, at 5:45pm, with it’s mule-drawn king and flambeaux lit floats, telling a story as the traverse the city, followed by the Knights of Chaos, when it’s theme will finally be revealed at 6:30. Also uptown is the Krewe of Muses, another all-female krewe with over 650 riders at 6:30 with their student-designed throw cup.


February 28
Again in Uptown, we have three parades in a row, starting with Krewe of Hermes at 6pm, a krewe started in 1937, whose captain leads the parade in full regalia upon a white horse. Then at 6:30 is the Krewe d’Etat, rolling with 415 male riders, revealing it’s secret theme and throwing blinking beads. Finally at 7pm, Krewe of Morpheus comes through with its 500 male and female riders and “old-time” traditional parade experience.

March 1large mardi gras float with clown face and revelers
At 10:45AM in the Westbank is the parade of the Krewe of Nomtoc, (New Orleans Most Talked Of Club), with its famous throws and 400 all African American male and female riders. 11AM in Uptown is the historic Krewe of Iris, formed in 1917, all female, and following strict traditions such as full masks and white gloves. At Noon, Krewe of Tucks, a humorous group with an “Animal House” flair. Mid-City at 4:15pm, super-krewe Endymion rolls with 2,700 masked riders, throwing millions of beads and Endymion 2014 collectible throws, and Grand Marshall Carrie Underwood. At 6:30PM in Metairie, Krewe of Isis brings the Egypt to Louisiana with 250 riders and 21 floats.

Mardi Gras parade float with enormous green alligatorMarch 2
Sunday is a big day for Uptown with 4 parades, starting at 11am with Krewe of Okeanos with 250 riders of both sexes, then at 11:45, the Krewe of Mid-City, formed in 1933 and considered “The best day parade in Mardi Gras”. At Noon, the Krewe of Thoth rolls with its wonderful throws, and making sure to parade past health care facilities for those who wouldn’t otherwise be able to see a parade. Later, at 5:15 pm, Krewe of Bacchus rolls with it’s grand marshall, House himself, Hugh Laurie. If you find yourself in Metairie at 5:30PM, you can see Krewe of Napoleon and its French theme, with the Emperor and Jospehine and the Arc De Triumph pulled by white horses.

March 3
Krewe of Proteus rolls Uptown at 5:15pm with its giant seashell protecting the mysterious king and historical parade chassis from 1882. 6pm will find Krewe of Orpheus, another super-krewe with grand marshall Fats Domino and king Quentin Tarantino. Moving on to Metarie at 6:15PM with Krewe of Hera, one of only two female Krewes in the parish, followed by Krewe of Zeus, a Greek themed parade with a mule-drawn king’s float and calliope.

The next post in our series will be all about the Big Day itself!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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New Orleans Parade List for Mardi Gras 2014 – February 15th – February 23rd

The carnival season officially started on January 6th with the Joan d’Arc parade, but the Mardi Gras parade float- laughing jester head with green, yellow and purple costumeaction really heats up in New Orleans on February 15th. Here is a list of the parades for 2014:

February 15th:
Krewe du Vieux rolls its naughty self through the French Quarter starting at 6pm, followed by Krewe Delusion, a satirical parade with a secret theme.

February 16:
Krewe of Perseus will roll through Slidell at 1pm with it’s 2014 theme, “It’s 5 O’Clock Somewhere!”

February 21st:
Starts at 3pm in the French Quarter with Krewe of Cork, celebrating wine, food and fun. At 6pm, head uptown for the Krewe of Oshun parade, which is family-friendly, followed by the Krewe of Cleopatra, the first all-female organization on the Uptown.

February 22nd: Krewe of Adonis logo, handsome blonde man with big muscles
The West Bank will come alive at 11:45am with the Mystic Knights of Adonis, 200 male and female riders, 16 floats and family-oriented. Move to Chalmette  by 1:00pm to catch the Knights of Nemesis, a businessman’s group, or go Uptown for a series of parades all in a row, starting with the Krewe of Pontchartrain, then the Krewe Delusion, followed by  the Krewe of Freret. Stay uptown til 6pm, when here come the Knights of Sparta, followed by Krewe of Pygmalion. Also at 6pm is the Krewe of Caesar in Metairie and the Krewe of Olympia in Covington. At 6:30 in Slidell, see the Mystic Krewe of Titans, an all-male krewe whose throws include cups with the Mystic Krewe of Titans logo, medallion beads, footballs, t-shirts, lighted tambourines, foam batons and necklaces. Finally, The Intergalactic Krewe of Chewbacchus rolls through Marigney at 8pm, with its elaborate hand-made throws and sci-fi theme.

Krewe of Barkus official poster- Dogzilla licking the city of New OrleansFebruary 23rd (Family Sunday):
Head Uptown at noon for Krewe of Carrollton, followed by Krewe of King Arthur and Merlin, AKA “New Orleans’ Friendliest Mardi Gras Krewe” and then Krewe of Alla, whose throws are generous and of a good variety. Back in Slidell at 1pm, the Krewe of Dionysis rolls with 18 floats, including 11 double-deckers. At 2pm, choose between the dog-centered Krewe of Barkus in the French Quarter with its theme “DOGZILLA – Barkus Licks the Crescent City”, or the very unique Krewe of Tchefuncte BOAT parade in Madisonville.

We’ll continue the fun on the next post with the parades from February 26 – March 3, culminating this series with the parade list for THE BIG DAY itself! Don’t forget 1896 O’Malley House when looking for Mardi Gras lodging!

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Mardi Gras History

Mardi Gras King Cake, white frosting with purple, green, and gold sugarMardi Gras is a celebration with ancient roots. Some say that it’s associated with the Roman Saturnalia celebration, and was adopted by the early church fathers to entice the new converts. From there, the practices spread to Europe, where some other pieces of the Mardi Gras puzzle entered the picture, such as King Cakes. These are thought to be descendants of cakes that we handed out to the peasantry by the landed gentry upon horseback. Along with the cakes were coins and other trinkets- reminiscent of today’s parade throws.

The actual words “Mardi Gras” translate to “Fat Tuesday” and represent that last day for  excess before Lent begins. Mardi Gras or Carnival season itself starts every year on January 6th, also known as Twelfth Night or Epiphany- the 12th day of Christmas and the beginning of the days of frivolity that conclude on the eve of Ash Wednesday.

How Mardi Gras came to the new world remains a mystery, with several iterations of the story- one tale has the celebration brought to America in 1699 by Sieur d’Iberville, a French explorer who landed in what is modern Mobile, and named the area “Pointe du Mardi Gras”, as it was the eve of the holiday. Some hold that students home from studying in France dressed in costumes and paraded the streets of New Orleans in the early 1700s, which was embraced by the people of the city and became an annual ritual. Others say it simply came with the French settlers in what is now known as Louisiana.

mardi gras parade with float at night However it got here, it has never left! The celebration has evolved over the years, becoming a riotous frolic that lasts for two months or more, depending on the date of Easter each year. It’s even an official state holiday in Louisiana! Parades started really taking off in the early 1800′s. Krewes came along, with the introduction of floats (also know as “tableaux cars”- I think we should bring that back!), Krewes starting throwing trinkets from the floats, and the modern Mardi Gras parade was born. The floats have become more elaborate, as have the “throws”- and ladies, you do not have to flash your “assets” to get beads- just catch them! There are now over 70 krewes bringing the fun to the city with parades almost every day from February 15th until the Big Day.

The colorsclose up of purple, gold and green Mardi Gras beads of Mardi Gras are everywhere! They are Purple (justice), Green (faith), and Gold (power). They were adopted after the visiting Russian Grand Duke Alexis Romanoff suggested them, based upon his family’s heraldic colors. The story goes that when LSU was picking colors for the university, the shops were full of Mardi Gras colors. LSU decided to use purple and gold, which left Tulane only the green!

We love our Mardi Gras guests and they appreciate our 24/7 free soft drinks, beer and wine as well as the delicious breakfast that soaks it all up, enabling them to party another day!

Larry Watts
Innkeeper, 1896 O’Malley House

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New Orleans Mardi Gras Indians Super Sunday

If you’re not a New Orleans resident, you probably are not aware of an annual Super Sunday that doesn’t have anything to do with football, unless you are a Tremé fan.

Every year on thmgi-2e Sunday closest to St. Joseph’s Day, the Mardi Gras Indians put on parades. This year, that Sunday is March 17th – also St.Patrick’s Day – which will make for a very full day for both visitors and natives.

The history of the Mardi Gras Indians is very interesting. There are about 40 Tribes, loosely connected by the Uptown Indians, who have more abstract African-inspired suits; and the Downtown Indians, who have more pictorial suits with strong Native American influence. In the older days, the Parade was a day for settling scores, with masking keeping the avengers from being identified. mgiThat’s all in the past though, with the competition now centering on the  beautiful and gorgeous costumes, which are called Suits .

In the Super Sunday parade, the Indians wear the heavy, beautifully and ornately decorated Suits, which weigh up to and over 100 pounds. The Suits are heavily feathered and beaded, and take 6-9 months to design and build, and cost thousands of dollars.

From Knowla.org: “Membership in a Mardi Gras Indian tribe is voluntary and based on social networking rather than birthright. Tribes are organized with very specific roles for each member, following a system begun by early tribes such as the Creole Wild West and Yellow Pocahontas. The big chief is the tribal leader, often assisted by second chiefs and queens. The spy boy marches several blocks in front of the chiefs and queens, seeking out other tribes. He relays directions to the flag boy, who notifies the chief by waving a flag or stick. When tribes meet, the wild man clears a path among the onlookers so the chiefs can face off. Changes in the tribe membership often lead to changes in these positions, but the hierarchy of the tribal organization—akin to a military unit—is strictly maintained. Matters of any significance fall under the authority of the chief. “

The Song “Iko Iko” is based on a confrontation by two Tribes:

The main parade will take place in the Central City neighborhood, originating at A.L. Davis Park (Washington and LaSalle streets) at noon. The route is:

Starts on LaSalle
Left at Martin Luther King Blvd.
Left at South Claiborne Avenue
Left at Washington Avenue
Ends back at A.L. Davis Park

Come and learn about something new in New Orleans, and stay with us at 1896 O’Malley House while you’re at it!

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Join the Krewes and Parades in New Orleans at Mardi Gras 2013


While you stroll in New Orleans
You ought to go see the Mardi Gras
If you go to New Orleans
You ought to go see the Mardi Gras
When you see the Mardi Gras
Somebody’ll tell you what’s Carnival for
–Professor Longhair

It’s time!  Time to make your plans for Mardi Gras! 

Mardi Gras History

Mardi Gras celebrations began as early as 1699, before the French adopted it and brought it to North America.  Once in New Orleans, balls and fetes thrived, were forbidden, and eventually resumed …the party could not be stopped!  Mardi Gras grew from masked people traveling through the streets to official parades.  In spite of the ups and downs, Mardi Gras remains to be America’s biggest party, and truly an amazing event!

Mardi Gras Krewes and Parades

RexDon’t miss out on the festivities throughout this time!  From Balls to the Parades, the Krewes are anxious to provide a great time and memorable experiences.  Mardi Gras Krewes organize parades, throw balls, and a variety of social events throughout the Carnival season.  The Krewes are responsible for maintaining several Mardi Gras traditions such as the flag and choosing the Mardi Gras King!

Please see New Orleans Online, for a schedule of all of the parades, including information about each Krewe.  New Orleans Online is our resource for this information (and more) about Mardi Gras, so check it out!

Recharge with us!

When you’re reading to call it a night, come back and stay with us at 1896 O’Malley House, our bed &  breakfast is just 15-20 minutes from the French Quarter by streetcar – and our comfortable rooms will provide the perfect rejuvenation for the next day’s merriment.

 

 

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3 Weeks till Mardi Gras 2013 – New Orleans’ Biggest Party!

Happy New Year from 1896 O’Malley House Bed & Breakfast!

It’s that time again – time to make your reservations for the biggest party around!  Mardi Gras is just around the corner and you need a place to stay during the festivities!   In New Orleans, you’ll find every Creole delight such as Jambalaya and Beignets to Gumbo and King Cake.  You can enjoy the parades and parties from January 19 through February 12, 2013.  But where will you stay?  1896 O’Malley House still has available rooms during this time – but don’t delay in booking your room – check our availability, and make your reservation today!

Our bed and breakfast is conveniently located near the French Quarter, city park, fairgrounds, the Garden District, and more; providing easy access to all of the festivities!  During your stay you’ll experience comfortable accommodations including:

  • Comfortable beds
  • Luxurious Linens
  • Jacuzzi tubs
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • LCD TVs

And don’t forget you’ll start each day with a hearty bed and breakfast, preparing you for the exhilarating events ahead.

Don’t wait -  have rooms available, but that won’t last long!  Contact us at (866)266-1896 or email Larry at larry@1896omalleyhouse.com .

We can’t wait for you to join us for Mardi Gras!

(The Mardi Gras image can be found for free here.)

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Happy Holidays from 1896 O’Malley House Bed and Breakfast

Colonel Parker Suite

Happy Holidays from 1896 O’Malley House Bed and Breakfast   

In our last few blog posts we have enjoyed sharing all of the festive and merry things New Orleans offers for Christmas and New Year’s.  Known as the City that Never Sleeps, you will find any number of fun ways to celebrate the holidays here in the Big Easy.

Where will you stay though?  We have the answer: 1896 O’Malley House Bed and Breakfast has several rooms available between now and New Year’s Eve!  Reserve your room today, before it’s too late, for a special holiday getaway with someone you love.

Why choose 1896 O’Malley House Bed and Breakfast?  Here are just a few reasons:

Each room features a Jacuzzi tub, luxurious accommodations.
Check out the i-Pad in your room, loaded with our custom app which includes local restaurants & menus, as well as information about local attractions and tours.
Wake each morning to a home cooked breakfast, featuring a different menu every day!
Complimentary wine, beer, soda, coffee/tea is available to our guests all day long.
Hop on the streetcar right outside the Inn for easy transport around NOLA.
With our mid-city location, you can walk to Mid-City Park, restaurants, and churches.

What’s happening in New Orleans around the holidays?

All nearby restaurants are open!
Walk to Mid-City Park and check out Christmas in the Park (a festive light show) now through January 6, 2013.
Stroll to many local restaurants including:  Mandina’s, Rue 127, Redemption, Venezia, Doson’s Noodle House, and many more!
Celebrate Christmas services at several nearby churches.

New Year’s is a time for refreshment and renewal, so be sure to schedule an appointment for a little personal pampering the eco-friendly Woodhouse Day Spa located just a few blocks from the Inn.  Add a little extra sparkle to your celebrations by treating yourself to a manicure and pedicure, or relax before you return to business-as-usual with a massage session.  Woodhouse Day Spa also offers signature services for the gentleman, as well as couples.

We look forward to hosting you during your holiday adventures in New Orleans – so make your reservation today!

P.S.  Due to recent cancellations we have a few rooms available for Super Bowl & Mardi Gras 2013 – check our website for the details!