Monthly Archives: January 2014

French Quarter Holidays in New Orleans Louisiana Events Mardi Gras Mardi Gras New Orleans Events

New Orleans Parade List for Mardi Gras 2014 – February 15th – February 23rd

The carnival season officially started on January 6th with the Joan d’Arc parade, but the Mardi Gras parade float- laughing jester head with green, yellow and purple costumeaction really heats up in New Orleans on February 15th. Here is a list of the parades for 2014:

February 15th:
Krewe du Vieux rolls its naughty self through the French Quarter starting at 6pm, followed by Krewe Delusion, a satirical parade with a secret theme.

February 16:
Krewe of Perseus will roll through Slidell at 1pm with it’s 2014 theme, “It’s 5 O’Clock Somewhere!”

February 21st:
Starts at 3pm in the French Quarter with Krewe of Cork, celebrating wine, food and fun. At 6pm, head uptown for the Krewe of Oshun parade, which is family-friendly, followed by the Krewe of Cleopatra, the first all-female organization on the Uptown.

February 22nd: Krewe of Adonis logo, handsome blonde man with big muscles
The West Bank will come alive at 11:45am with the Mystic Knights of Adonis, 200 male and female riders, 16 floats and family-oriented. Move to Chalmette  by 1:00pm to catch the Knights of Nemesis, a businessman’s group, or go Uptown for a series of parades all in a row, starting with the Krewe of Pontchartrain, then the Krewe Delusion, followed by  the Krewe of Freret. Stay uptown til 6pm, when here come the Knights of Sparta, followed by Krewe of Pygmalion. Also at 6pm is the Krewe of Caesar in Metairie and the Krewe of Olympia in Covington. At 6:30 in Slidell, see the Mystic Krewe of Titans, an all-male krewe whose throws include cups with the Mystic Krewe of Titans logo, medallion beads, footballs, t-shirts, lighted tambourines, foam batons and necklaces. Finally, The Intergalactic Krewe of Chewbacchus rolls through Marigney at 8pm, with its elaborate hand-made throws and sci-fi theme.

Krewe of Barkus official poster- Dogzilla licking the city of New OrleansFebruary 23rd (Family Sunday):
Head Uptown at noon for Krewe of Carrollton, followed by Krewe of King Arthur and Merlin, AKA “New Orleans’ Friendliest Mardi Gras Krewe” and then Krewe of Alla, whose throws are generous and of a good variety. Back in Slidell at 1pm, the Krewe of Dionysis rolls with 18 floats, including 11 double-deckers. At 2pm, choose between the dog-centered Krewe of Barkus in the French Quarter with its theme “DOGZILLA – Barkus Licks the Crescent City”, or the very unique Krewe of Tchefuncte BOAT parade in Madisonville.

We’ll continue the fun on the next post with the parades from February 26 – March 3, culminating this series with the parade list for THE BIG DAY itself! Don’t forget 1896 O’Malley House when looking for Mardi Gras lodging!

Blog Holidays in New Orleans Mardi Gras Mardi Gras New Orleans Events

Mardi Gras History

Mardi Gras King Cake, white frosting with purple, green, and gold sugarMardi Gras is a celebration with ancient roots. Some say that it’s associated with the Roman Saturnalia celebration, and was adopted by the early church fathers to entice the new converts. From there, the practices spread to Europe, where some other pieces of the Mardi Gras puzzle entered the picture, such as King Cakes. These are thought to be descendants of cakes that we handed out to the peasantry by the landed gentry upon horseback. Along with the cakes were coins and other trinkets- reminiscent of today’s parade throws.

The actual words “Mardi Gras” translate to “Fat Tuesday” and represent that last day for  excess before Lent begins. Mardi Gras or Carnival season itself starts every year on January 6th, also known as Twelfth Night or Epiphany- the 12th day of Christmas and the beginning of the days of frivolity that conclude on the eve of Ash Wednesday.

How Mardi Gras came to the new world remains a mystery, with several iterations of the story- one tale has the celebration brought to America in 1699 by Sieur d’Iberville, a French explorer who landed in what is modern Mobile, and named the area “Pointe du Mardi Gras”, as it was the eve of the holiday. Some hold that students home from studying in France dressed in costumes and paraded the streets of New Orleans in the early 1700s, which was embraced by the people of the city and became an annual ritual. Others say it simply came with the French settlers in what is now known as Louisiana.

mardi gras parade with float at night However it got here, it has never left! The celebration has evolved over the years, becoming a riotous frolic that lasts for two months or more, depending on the date of Easter each year. It’s even an official state holiday in Louisiana! Parades started really taking off in the early 1800′s. Krewes came along, with the introduction of floats (also know as “tableaux cars”- I think we should bring that back!), Krewes starting throwing trinkets from the floats, and the modern Mardi Gras parade was born. The floats have become more elaborate, as have the “throws”- and ladies, you do not have to flash your “assets” to get beads- just catch them! There are now over 70 krewes bringing the fun to the city with parades almost every day from February 15th until the Big Day.

The colorsclose up of purple, gold and green Mardi Gras beads of Mardi Gras are everywhere! They are Purple (justice), Green (faith), and Gold (power). They were adopted after the visiting Russian Grand Duke Alexis Romanoff suggested them, based upon his family’s heraldic colors. The story goes that when LSU was picking colors for the university, the shops were full of Mardi Gras colors. LSU decided to use purple and gold, which left Tulane only the green!

We love our Mardi Gras guests and they appreciate our 24/7 free soft drinks, beer and wine as well as the delicious breakfast that soaks it all up, enabling them to party another day!

Larry Watts
Innkeeper, 1896 O’Malley House

5K Louisiana Events Sport Events Uncategorized

The Louisiana Marathon – January 17th -19th, 2014 – Geaux Run!

Louisiana Marathon logo - green and brown sneaker footprint The third annual Louisiana Marathon will be held in Baton Rouge on January 19th, 2014, but you don’t have to wait until then to get into the fun of the “Running Festival”! The festivities start on Friday the 17th at the Baton Rouge River Center, where the Expo will be taking place from 1-6pm. The Expo is open to and free to the public, and is the place to pick up your registration packets for all of the races, as there will be no packet pick-up on the race day. Over 35 exhibitors will be on the Expo floor to present all the latest trends and updates in running. See the latest gear and get information about about the world of running, health & fitness. The Expo continues on Saturday from 11am-5pm.

Also on Saturday, tons of fun continue with the 5K race and the Advocate Kids Marathon, which is a 1.2 mile race. The 5K is for sprinters, joggers and walkers. Make sure to register in advance for these two races. A special treat is in store for runners who choose to participate in the 5K AND the marathon or half-marathon – the Deja Va Crawfish Platter. Deja Vu award - black seafood tray with Louisiana Marathon on blue printThese favored runners will always remember their time in Baton Rouge every time they serve seafood! Along with the races, Saturday will be a great time at AZ Young Park for the kids with the Family Fest, which will feature lots of music, inflatables, face painting, food, and much more. Also on the 18th, there will be speakers on running, as well as the highly anticipated Pastalya Dinner, a chance to carb-load before the big race!

Sunday is the big day! The marathon and half both start at 7am. Continuing through the day will be music all through the race course, and the “best marathon post-party”, the Finish Festival at AZ Young Park.

We would love to be your host for the Marathon weekend, see our website for availability! Don’t wait til it’s to late to register for any of the races. Visit the registration page here for more information today!